Homemade

Pure homemade foods with unique taste.

Unique homemade food products by small family businesses applying traditional methods of production and use of pure raw materials. Keeping the traditions and customs of the region have chosen to produce various products, thus offering the opportunity to youngest to experience these flavors. Here you can fin...

Pure homemade foods with unique taste.

Unique homemade food products by small family businesses applying traditional methods of production and use of pure raw materials. Keeping the traditions and customs of the region have chosen to produce various products, thus offering the opportunity to youngest to experience these flavors. Here you can find traditional sweet and treats like pasteli, the Greek sesame bar with Greek honey, traditional Greek pasta, barley rusks cooked in wooden oven, halva and great tahini paste, and finally very fine wines.

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  • Pasta & frumenty

    Greek pasta is closely related to the traditional cuisine and has a strong local character.

    Italians are not the only people who love pasta. The Greeks use pasta frequently in their cuisine and serve it with different sauces and with different meat and vegetable dishes. The pastas most used, aside from regular spaghetti, are long macaroni, manestra, hilopites and elbow macaroni. Italian-made pasta may have the reputation for the best quality, but excellent quality pasta is made in Greece, also. The best pasta is made from hard, durum wheat that is yellow in color and has a shiny texture. The Greeks are fond of pasta. They enjoy a fine light spaghetti with a mild butter sauce as well as one well spiked with garlic butter sauce—macaroni and Feta cheese or their delightful Mizi- thra (cottage cheese) sprinkled with a tablespoon or two of Parmesan. Tiny bits of pasta are used as a filler in sauces to adorn squid and fish. When the Greeks make their own macaroni,they make it in squares.

  • Bakery & rusks

    Bakery products cooked in a wood oven using pure ingredients and natural yeast.

    Greek’s economy mainly depended on stockbreeding and agriculture. The lifestyle of the Greek people was hard, yet fully adapted to the Greek’s geological and financial environment. Therefore, created special nutritional habits, adapted both to some daily needs and the potentials of the Greek’s residents. One of these habits is the rusk, which was created due to the need, of stock-breeders in particular, to eat bread that would be kept in good condition and be tasty and nutritional at the same time. Therefore, the Greek rusk became an inseparable friend for all those who had to be away from home for a long time. Due to it's particularly good taste and the great variety that was created with time,  the rusk is always found on the Greek table, next to the bread and has taken up a special place in all the social and festive functions of the Greek’s residents.

  • Halva & tahini

    Homemade halva that is kneaded by hand in a traditional way.

    Halvas, a traditional sweet found in Greece. Is made from 60% tahini (the oily, creamy paste of ground sesame seeds) and a mixture of sugars, and is available plain, with nuts, cocoa or honey. It is an ideal food, traditionally eaten by Greeks during their religious fasts when the body is detoxifying and requires pure foods that supply quick energy and great nutritional value. It can also be eaten as a dessert, with cinnamon and lemon juice. Halvas and tahini are all high-protein foods, especially rich in calcium, iron and phosphorus, and containing potassium, magnesium, zinc, selenium and certain amino acids lacking in other plant foods. They also contain unsaturated fatty acids that contribute towards a significant reduction in cholesterol. Tahini is known in many Middle Eastern countries and appears in many traditional main dishes, soups and appetisers.

  • Sweets & treats

    The Greeks have a particular fondness for sweet things.

    In Greece, it is the custom that when a guest comes to visit, he is offered a sweet, called "glyko". The sweet is placed in a large bowl, set on a tray that also contains a small dish, a glass of water or aperitif, and a spoon. When the guest is offered this sweet, he is expected to take a spoonful of glyko, place it on the small dish, take small bites, drink some of the water, and wish the hostess good health. Today, this custom may be falling by the wayside, but the popularity of eating preserves still remains.

  • Wine & spirits

    Greece has many excellent wines and spirits.

    Various regions produce different kinds and the character of each wine differs depending upon the variety of grapes used. Each wine has particular qualities to recommend it. An aperitif such as ouzo, accompanied by a good range of mezedes, can be an excuse to invite friends in, while wine livens up the daily meal and is essential on special occasions. Tsipouro and tsikoudia are brandies, made from the left over grape mash after the juice has been squeezed from the grapes. Tsikoudia is the local firewater of Crete and tsipouro is made by most villagers throughout Greece. Often they are made at home. We all know how much a good wine can add to the enjoyment of a meal. Even the best-cooked dish becomes tasteless when it is consumed all by itself, without the stimulating effect of alternating mouthfuls with sips of wine.